Tag Archives: storytelling

Heritage and other early years play sessions

We revisited St Pauls Family centre yesterday with Bristol Old Vic to continue experimenting with outreach session for early years/stay and play.

Repeating the session, with some alterations had a very positive impact. We led a less structured workshop and created play stations around the room to investigate ‘hat making’; ticket stamping; set building; object exploration and then later a stage- with curtain. We kept an element of the ‘storytelling’ – the context of theatre, the olden days and what happened in theatres but allowed much more time, and space to react, allowing the flow and rhythm to be child led.

Our clearest discoveries were that a mixture of:

  • historic objects
  • loose parts
  • physical storyteling
  • craft

which allowed for

  • group play
  • individual play
  • performance – both by facilitators and children
  • intergenerational craft activities (and conversation/new relationships as a result)
  • questioning and exploration

Going forward I would like to take this model into public heritage spaces- perhaps the foyer/cafe of Bristol Old Vic after refurbishment.

 

(pictures to come)

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Heritage workshop

I have been working with Bristol Old Vic to devise outreach workshops engaging groups with the theatre’s history. The work is part of a Heritage Lottery Funded programme. We have started by prototyping workshops with family centres that are within walking distance and today we ran a session with St Paul’s Family Centre. The workshop was aimed at pre school (under 4) and their parents.

We wanted to engage people with the heritage of Bristol Old Vic so we wanted to play with the concept of Theatre- both as a building and a format- and history. History is particularly tricky with such young children as time is such an abstract concept. Essentially we played with ‘the olden days’ and ‘theatre’.

We used a variety of play tools and theatre practice in the workshop including role playing, imaginative play, loose parts within a context, craft, dressing up and investigating unusual objects.

We were fortunate to have been able to raid the BOV prop-store and started by inviting the children and parents to investigate and play with objects including an old fashioned phone, bones, candles, a toy trumpet and bellows. This allowed us to think about what the objects were or could be and how they relate to objects today. The phone was a big hit. The bellows proved fun as a movable contraption, also feeling the air. A father talked to us about the bellows he used as a child in Somalia- the size and shape of them and remarked that he hadn’t seen bellows for 27 years! He is going to Somalia soon and has offered to bring some back to the children’s centre so they can use them at the fire pit. It was a wonderful unexpected link into someone’s personal history. The toy trumpet and the telescope were utilised a lot and some children used all their senses to explore the objects. On our next visit we may explore the objects further and leading into stories inspired by them.

We played with the notions of a theatre set and costumes by creating environments with our bodies- the ocean today and then exploring a theatre model box. Using wooden blocks we created our own ‘theatre sets’ including a cafe, a mountain and a volcano!

We made tall hats to wear to the theatre and went on a walk to the Vic, being careful not to step in horse poo along the way! Once ‘inside the theatre’ we distributed tickets, bought sweets (and cockles and pigs trotters!); chose our seats and took turns on the stage. We had animal impressionists, singers, an orchestra, performing horses and dogs, string people and balancers. Great acts, and a brilliant reflection of the Bristol Old Vic programme in 1770! We all enjoyed giving rounds of applause, next time we might do some booing too!

It was reassuring to find that by using playwork and devised theatre tools in a specific context (in this case heritage) worked really well. The different context allowed excitement and wow factor and the embedded interactivity of the methods, plus the fluidity of exercises meant that we could respond quickly to individual needs while also holding the whole group. Next time we’re going to create more ‘stations’ to play in and enjoy revisiting the now familiar objects and format to deepen the exploration in ‘Ye Olde Vic’

Pictures to come soon…..